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Thread: 10th Century recipe VS Modern day antibiotics?

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    10th Century recipe VS Modern day antibiotics?

    A 10th Century recipe for eye infections has tested more effective than modern-day antibiotics.

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    Astounding ... The ancient Anglo-Saxon recipe — made up of onion, wine, garlic and bile taken from a cow’s stomach — could hold the key to curing the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection.

    A REVOLTING treatment from the 10th Century is being touted as more effective against antibiotic-resistant infections than contemporary medicine.

    The Anglo-Saxon recipe — made up of onion, wine, garlic and bile taken from a cow’s stomach, and used to cure eye infections during the Dark Ages — could hold the key to curing the Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, a bacteria that is resistant to many antibiotics and can cause life-threatening bloodstream infections, pneumonia and surgical site infections.

    The freak discovery came about by chance during a discussion about infectious diseases between University of Nottingham academics, which saw an expert in Old English bring up the recipe found in an old medical textbook.

    Dr Christina Lee told microbiologists about Bald’s Leechbook — an Anglo-Saxon medical textbook kept in the British Library which contains remedies for treating infections and other ailments.

    After translating a potion targeted at treating styes — an infection of an eyelash usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus — scientists decided to recreate the recipe and test it on modern-day infections.

    The results? Astounding.

    “I still can’t quite believe how well this one thousand year old antibiotic actually seems to be working, when we got the first results we were just utterly dumbfounded. We did not see this coming at all,” Dr Freya Harrison, a microbiologist from the University of Nottingham told The Independent.

    On their own, the garlic, cow’s bile and wine were not effective — but combined, they managed to kill up to 90 per cent of MRSA bacteria in infected mice.

    The findings will soon be presented at the Society for General Microbiology’s annual conference in Birmingham, UK.

    Texas Tech University microbiologist, Dr Kendra Rumbaugh, said she was initially “quite sceptical” about the potion.

    “However, this ‘ancient’ solution performed better than the current ‘gold standard’ (vancomycin) and killed more than 90% of the MRSA in the wounds.”

    According to the BBC, the book is one of the earliest examples of what loosely resembles modern-day medical practices, with a strong emphasis on observation and experimentation.

    http://www.news.com.au/technology/sc...-1227285954684

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