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Thread: Asteroid Impact ?

  1. #1
    In Memory Fredkc's Avatar
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    Asteroid Impact ?

    Ross; I could use a reality check on this one. It's down your way.

    Lifted it straight off another forum, so....

    But I will say If this is as big as we suspect there will be more,so heads up. Oh and you will not see this on msm. The Gov took the stand of ten years ago IF we had a in bound killer rock not to say a word till the last minute, just before they cut public access to sat feed so we can not look for ourselves. Feel free to look that up. I will post 3 vids as close to order as I can get. As of right now there are reports from New Zealand of above normal fire ball activity. This was just one report starting on the 16th. ...



    Then... This was from the ISS on the 24th live stream.Someone got a lucky hit before NASA killed the stream. As a side note NASA said back in August that the public feed will be shut off for good as of Sept 30 2016???,



    And lastly, just because it was there....



    Heard anything about this?
    Fred
    "Life IS mystical! Its just that we're used to it." - Wolf, the movie
    "Dad, if God is everywhere then, when he's in a piece of paper, is he squished?" - My daughter, age 7

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    You're freaking me out, mannnn. It doesn't square with what I've read about potential impacts but then...would they tell us.

    However, it is the 28th, so that's a good thing. Incidentally, there was a lot of chatter about Nibiru until the pretense got too extreme with constant daily updates about a 'new' date. That was finally dropped and now it seems another 'big' one is on its way. I think the prospective date I read for a real risk was around 2026 or sumpin' like that.
    Last edited by Adam Bomm; 09-28-2016 at 01:00 PM.

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    Administrator Ross's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    Ok, well nothing here...did have a good meteor back in April but diddly since then.

    THE THREAT IS VERY REAL
    Hmmm...ok, we are well past the dates said...5 days ago. So, either 'they' were successful in destroying said Asteroid or it's another bogus hoax, and I'm picking it's bogus. However, if you don't hear from me over the next week then I guess Iv'e been asterioded

    I'm of the opinion that such a major threat, involving countless folk organizing a strike to destroy an Asteroid, along with countless amateur Astronomy buffs all looking and working in volunteer roles with their respective Astronomy clubs, and these folk are not stupid and totaling around 500,000 registered, could not keep such an event secret....just ain't gonna happen.
    Last edited by Ross; 09-28-2016 at 01:08 PM.

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fredkc View Post
    Then... This was from the ISS on the 24th live stream.Someone got a lucky hit before NASA killed the stream. As a side note NASA said back in August that the public feed will be shut off for good as of Sept 30 2016???,
    It's close to impossible to gauge size without some perspective...so as far as HUGGEEE, it can't be determined by that footage. And it would be long gone by now...unless it was a fragment but then that's been 4 days ago.

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    In Memory Fredkc's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    but then...would they tell us.
    I think that if they knew a planet killer was on its way, they'd keep shut until all you had time for was a good steak, and a go at the wife... or the neighbor's.

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Bomm View Post
    That was finally dropped and now it seems another 'big' one is on its way.
    Well, you know what the old lady with a bloody nose said, right?
    "If it ain't one damned thing, it's another."
    "Life IS mystical! Its just that we're used to it." - Wolf, the movie
    "Dad, if God is everywhere then, when he's in a piece of paper, is he squished?" - My daughter, age 7

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    I was traveling once from Clovis NM to Roswell on a business trip and about half way there I saw an unusually bright star. As I was new to NM my thinking was that the stars were really bright in the elevated location. It was coming on dawn and the damn star wasn't going away. Talk about freaking out. I was thinking what the hell is that, an incoming asteroid or what! I was checking the other cars on the road that I was driving on to tell if I was the only one crazy enough to be freaking out. It seemed I was. After daybreak the star became a silver object (That I had seen from over 50 miles away). It turns out it was a 'round space dirigible' doing a show in Roswell. I will say that when I asked some of my associates if they had heard about it, they all said no and looked at me as if I was out of my mind. In fact, they said as much.

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    Administrator Ross's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    So here's a taste of whats going on....

    Research isnít just for the professionals. Amateur astronomers do cutting-edge science, too, sometimes partnering with professional astronomers in pro-am collaborations. Thanks to their ability to move and observe when and where they choose, amateurs are also often better at tracking asteroids or hunting for new supernovae than many pros. Amateurs are also branching into spectroscopy, splitting starlight into its constituent wavelengths to study the composition of stars and other celestial objects.

    Here youíll find information on all these projects and more. Weíre always interested in hearing about new ways that amateurs are doing hardcore science, so if thereís something you do that isnít listed here, let us know how youíre contributing to astronomy.
    Go here: http://www.skyandtelescope.com/get-i...collaboration/

    NASA Mission Wants Amateur Astronomers to Target Asteroids


    WASHINGTON -- A new NASA outreach project will enlist the help of amateur astronomers to discover near-Earth objects (NEOs) and study their characteristics. NEOs are asteroids with orbits that occasionally bring them close to the Earth.

    Starting today, a new citizen science project called "Target Asteroids!" will support NASA's Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security - Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission objectives to improve basic scientific understanding of NEOs. OSIRIS-REx is scheduled for launch in 2016 and will study material from an asteroid.

    Amateur astronomers will help better characterize the population of NEOs, including their position, motion, rotation and changes in the intensity of light they emit. Professional astronomers will use this information to refine theoretical models of asteroids, improving their understanding about asteroids similar to the one OSIRIS-Rex will encounter in 2019, designated 1999 RQ36.

    OSIRIS-REx will map the asteroid's global properties, measure non-gravitational forces and provide observations that can be compared with data obtained by telescope observations from Earth. In 2023, OSIRIS-REx will return back to Earth at least 2.11 ounces (60 grams) of surface material from the asteroid.

    Target Asteroids! data will be useful for comparisons with actual mission data. The project team plans to expand participants in 2014 to students and teachers.

    "Although few amateur astronomers have the capability to observe 1999 RQ36 itself, they do have the capability to observe other targets," said Jason Dworkin, OSIRIS-REx project scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

    Previous observations indicate 1999 RQ36 is made of primitive materials. OSIRIS-REx will supply a wealth of information about the asteroid's composition and structure. Data also will provide new insights into the nature of the early solar system and its evolution, orbits of NEOs and their impact risks, and the building blocks that led to life on Earth.

    Amateur astronomers long have provided NEO tracking observations in support of NASA's NEO Observation Program. A better understanding of NEOs is a critically important precursor in the selection and targeting of future asteroid missions.

    "For well over 10 years, amateurs have been important contributors in the refinement of orbits for newly discovered near-Earth objects," said Edward Beshore, deputy principal investigator for the OSIRIS-REx mission at the University of Arizona in Tucson.


    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., will provide overall mission management, systems engineering and safety and mission assurance for OSIRIS-REx. Dante Lauretta is the mission's principal investigator at the University of Arizona. Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver will build the spacecraft. OSIRIS-REx is the third mission in NASA's New Frontiers Program. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages New Frontiers for the agency's Science Mission Directorate in Washington.
    http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012...each_NEOs.html

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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    Amateur Astronomers to 'Target Asteroids!'

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    Amateur astronomer observers like Tim Hunter will compile information about asteroids. These observations directly support NASA’s OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission and aid future mission designers and scientists. Citizen scientists' astronomy and photometry data will enable scientists to refine orbits, test models of the dynamical evolution and determine the composition of these objects. (Photo: Tim Hunter)



    Researchers on NASA's robotic asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are turning to amateur astronomers for new data on near-Earth asteroids in a citizen science observing campaign called Target Asteroids!

    Amateur astronomers are about to make observations that will affect current and future space missions to asteroids.

    Some will use custom-made, often automated telescopes equipped with CCD cameras in their backyards. Others will use home computers to make remote observations with more powerful telescopes states or continents away. Many belong to leading national and international amateur astronomy organizations with members ranging from retirees to school kids.

    Researchers on NASA's robotic asteroid sample return mission, OSIRIS-REx, are turning to amateur astronomers for new data on near-Earth asteroids in a citizen science observing campaign called Target Asteroids! The campaign starts in this month and will last at least to the end of this decade.

    The full name of the OSIRIS-REx mission is Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security – Regolith Explorer. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is to launch in 2016, reach a well-characterized primitive asteroid called 1999 RQ36 in 2019, examine that body up close during a 505-day rendezvous, then return at least 60 grams of it to Earth in 2023.

    "Asteroids are a rich and accessible historic archive of the origin of our solar system and life, a valuable source of mineral resources, and potentially hazardous Earth impactors that civilization must learn to deal with," said OSIRIS-REx Principal Investigator Dante Lauretta of the University of Arizona. "Our mission will address all these issues."

    1999 RQ36 – a 500-meter-diameter, dark carbonaceous asteroid – is difficult for even powerful Earth-based telescopes to observe at this time because it is distant from Earth.

    Amateur astronomers are asked to observe asteroids selected because they are in near-Earth orbits that can be reached by current-generation spacecraft and are at least 200 meters in diameter, said Target Asteroids! scientist Carl Hergenrother, head of the OSIRIS-REx astronomy working group.

    Precise orbits, sizes, rotation rates, physical composition and other important characteristics for these asteroids are largely unknown. Seventy-four asteroids are listed now, but the list will grow as observers get more information on known asteroids and discover new ones, Hergenrother said.

    "We want amateur astronomers to do astrometry (which precisely measures positions of objects), photometry (which measures brightness) and spectroscopy (which measures the colors, or wavelengths, of light) to discover as much as we can about these objects," he said.

    "These will be challenging objects to observe because they are very faint," said Target Asteroids! coordinator Dolores Hill of the OSIRIS-REx education and public outreach program. "Amateur astronomers may have to make what are called ‘track and stack' observations," a technique that acquires and adds multiple short images.

    "One of the major goals of having amateur astronomers on board is they can observe these objects every night, unlike professional astronomers who may get to telescopes once every few nights, or more typically once a month or every three months," Hergenrother said.

    People don't need to own their own telescopes or live under clear skies to work on Target Asteroids!, Hergenrother and Hill emphasized.

    For not much money, observers can now go online and sign up to use a growing network of quality robotic telescopes sited at some of the choicest astronomical spots in the country, they added.

    Scientists will compare data from amateur and professional astronomers' ground-based observations with data from OSIRIS-REx spacecraft instruments to learn more about Earth-crossing asteroids and identify likely candidates for future asteroid missions, they said.

    "The OSIRIS-REx mission truly is a ‘ground truth' mission, the connection between meteorites on the ground and asteroids that are still orbiting the sun that could hit the ground," Hill said.

    Not long ago, astronomers disparaged asteroids as the "vermin of the skies," said Ed Beshore, OSIRIS-REx deputy principal investigator. Astronomers saw asteroids as bothersome "noise," unwanted streaks of light that contaminated their photographic views of celestial objects farther out in the cosmos.

    That thinking changed when people realized how much damage near-Earth asteroids can do when they hit Earth as meteorites, Beshore said.

    For example, sophisticated mathematical modeling shows that the chunk of meteorite that blasted 1.25-kilometer-wide Meteor Crater out of northern Arizona's Colorado Plateau about 50,000 years ago was less than 70 meters wide. Granted, that space rock was a rare iron-nickel meteorite that carried a much greater wallop than a stony or carbonaceous meteorite of the same size would have had. But still, that's impressive.

    Until Beshore was named OSIRIS-REx deputy principal investigator earlier this year, he directed the UA's Catalina Sky Survey. This NASA-funded survey has led the world in searching for potentially hazardous NEOs, or near-Earth objects, since 2005. Amateur astronomers have helped enormously by providing follow-up observations that find orbits of newly discovered asteroids, Beshore said.

    "Amateur astronomy today is much different than it was, say, even in the mid-1990s," Beshore said. "The amateur astronomy community working now is extremely sophisticated. They have more advanced computers. They have developed a tremendous number of turnkey solutions to automate their telescopes. And they now can rent telescopes larger than most amateurs can afford.

    "You've got a lot of dedicated amateurs out there who really are working like professionals, making serious contributions to the field," he said.

    "Frankly, if they wanted to, many could probably get jobs as professionals. But they're probably making more money doing what they're doing at their day jobs."

    Target Asteroids! partner organizations so far include:

    The International Astronomical Search Collaboration, or IASC. The IASC is an educational outreach program that provides free, donated telescope time to amateur astronomers from 30 high schools and colleges in five countries for asteroid observations. Students in the U.S. and Poland already are analyzing results on one of the Target Asteroids! that IASC members made using a 1.3-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson last February.

    Astronomical League. An umbrella organization of about 140 amateur astronomy organizations across the U.S. Based in Kansas City, Mo., it promotes astronomy by encouraging public interest via local astronomy clubs.

    Association of Lunar & Planetary Observers. Founded in 1947, this organization facilitates research by both professional and amateur astronomers working in lunar, planetary and solar astronomy. Members and section coordinators are scattered all over the world.

    Oceanside Photo and Telescope, or OPT. One of the largest telescope retailers in the world, based in Oceanside, Calif., OPT provides technical expertise and astronomy equipment to educators and organizations across the country.

    NASA Night Sky Network is a nationwide coalition of amateur astronomy clubs that provide information about NASA missions and host astronomy events for the general public. The Night Sky Network is sponsored and supported by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory's PlanetQuest program.

    University of Arizona Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter. This UA science center is located where astronomical seeing is outstanding, at the 9,200-foot summit of Mount Lemmon in the Santa Catalina Mountains north of Tucson. It offers both nightly public astronomy programs and opportunities for remote observing using the 32-inch Schulman telescope and 24-inch Beshore telescope. The SkyCenter is a partner in the Sierra Stars Observing Network, a widening network of professional observatories working to make advanced imaging capabilities available to amateur astronomers at modest cost.

    The Catalina Sky Survey, UA Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. The Catalina Sky Survey has been the most successful near-Earth object survey for several years running. This survey discovered 586 near-Earth asteroids, or 65 percent of all NEO discoveries made in 2011. In fall 2008, CSS scientists became the first to observe an asteroid on a collision course with the Earth, allowing that object to be tracked and eventually recovered as meteorites in the Sudan's Nubian Desert.

    https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/ama...rget-asteroids

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    Administrator Ross's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    And this:

    NASA Releases New Asteroid Detection Software For Amateur Astronomers.

    Since the early 20th century, astronomers have relied on the same technique to detect asteroids -- they take images of a section in the sky and look for star-like objects that move between frames. However, with an increase in sensitivity of ground-based telescopes, it has become increasingly difficult for astronomers to sift through the massive pile of data and verify every single detection.

    In order to increase the frequency of asteroid detection, including of those bodies that could be potential threats to our planet, NASA has released a new software, developed in collaboration with Planetary Resources, Inc., capable of running on any standard PC. The software, which can be downloaded for free, will accept images from a telescope and run an algorithm on them to determine celestial bodies that are moving in a manner consistent with an asteroid.

    Amateur astronomers and asteroid hunters can also take images from their own telescopes and analyze them with the software. “The application will tell the user whether a matching asteroid record exists and offer a way to report new findings to the Minor Planet Center, which then confirms and archives new discoveries,” NASA said in a statement released Sunday.

    The new algorithm, which increases the chances of asteroid detection in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter by 15 percent, was created as part of NASA’s Asteroid Data Hunter challenge. The work is also of special interest to Planetary Resources, which hopes to mine asteroids for water and precious metals in the near future.

    “The Asteroid Data Hunter challenge has been successful beyond our hopes, creating something that makes a tangible difference to asteroid hunting astronomers and highlights the possibility for more people to play a role in protecting our planet,” Jason Kessler, program executive for NASA’s Asteroid Grand Challenge said in the statement. The grand challenge, sponsored by the NASA Tournament Lab, was announced in 2013 with an aim to find all “asteroid threats to human populations.”

    http://www.ibtimes.com/nasa-releases...nomers-1847946

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    Senior Member Zook_e_Pi's Avatar
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    Re: Asteroid Impact ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fredkc View Post
    I think that if they knew a planet killer was on its way, they'd keep shut until all you had time for was a good steak, and a go at the wife... or the neighbor's.
    Thanx for the hearty laugh, Fred. Hadn't laughed this hard since the last asteroid impact nanocomputations.


    Me? I ain't living in a neighborhood brimming with dreamy-looking wives. And I'm a form believer in the theory that nightmares don't belong in the category of dreams. So I'll have to settle for playing Fur Elise, wrongly, one last time.


    Pax
    Last edited by Zook_e_Pi; 09-28-2016 at 01:47 PM.

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