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Thread: Man and Myth

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Man and Myth

    Something to contemplate:

    Here's an excerpt from "The Basic Writings of C.G. Jung"

    "The man who thinks he can live without myth, or outside it, is an exception. He is like one uprooted, having no true link either with the past, or with ancestral life which continues within him, or yet with contemporary human society. He does not live in a house like other men, does not eat and drink like other men, but lives a life of his own, sunk in a subjective mania of his own devising, which he believes to be the newly discovered truth. This plaything of his reason never grips his vitals. It may occasionally lie heavy on his stomach, for that organ is apt to reject the products of reason as indigestible. The psyche is not of today; its ancestry goes back many millions of years. Individual consciousness is only the flower and the fruit of a season, sprung from the perennial rhizome beneath the earth; and it would find itself in better accord with the truth if it took the existence of the rhizome into its calculations. For the root matter is the mother of all things."

    My notation: rhizome in this context should be construed as myth, and further myth should not be viewed as 'anti-fact' but a 'reality' derived empirically not from thought and logic but an empiric truth resulting from empathic experience and verification, all emanating from the psyche. (Paraphrase of Jung's reflections)

    He further stated that the four foundations of the 'self' are thought/logic, feeling, sensation, and intuition. The more integrated these four fundamentals properties within the individual the more 'developed'/evolved the human (Some should find that very interesting)

    Adamm

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Man and Myth

    Another interesting excerpt and a common experience:

    Wundt gives a short account of the scholastic method in his work. "The method consisted firstly, in regarding as the chief aim of scientific investigation the discovery of a firmly established conceptual scheme capable of being applied in a uniform manner to the most varied problems; secondly, in laying an inordinate value upon certain general concepts, and consequently upon the verbal symbols designating these concepts, as a result of which an analysis of the meaning of words, or, in extreme cases, a vapid intellectual subtlety and splitting of hairs comes to replace an investigation of the real facts from which the concepts are abstracted"

    Talk about uniformity and generalization. This is a fundamental underpinning of 'propaganda'...what I call bullsh*t and LOL, isn't that pretty common.

    One of the problems that occurs in discussions is that without acknowledgement what is spoken is found to be 'objectionable' to reasonable thinking persons, If we assume that language is a manifestation of thinking which, in turn, is a manifestation of the 'mind' then the speaker becomes objectionable. In general, what is occurring is that the objectionable person is spouting 'perceptions', 'propaganda', and as cited earlier, just plain bullsh*t that has been promoted by the sinister forces at work. An attempt to adhere to 'socialized' sense of propriety regarding a legitimate scholastic approach is met with cries of "Political Correctness." This level of discourse constitutes an abandonment of not only the accepted thinking process but moral sensibility as well. It should be mentioned here that social conventions are agreed upon by society in general and that is precisely why they are conventions. To act in any other fashion is a violation of civilized contracts. If we are uncivilized then we are base animals, no different than the grunting caveman whose guttural utterance of 'ool' meant fodder.

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Man and Myth

    A little more that was offered by Jung was a refutation of the prevailing 19th Century philosophies of Hegel and Nietzsche that proclaimed that not only was man capable of understanding everything, he in essence already did because he was a god unto himself. This represented a denial of what Jung was postulating and that was that the psyche without serious scientific investigation had many aspects that were unknown if not unknowable by any other mechanism. This is the basis of his 'myth' and his position that God is not Dead, he, is in fact, alive and well in the human psyche.

    I find this inordinately important because it was these philosophies, which acted as adjuncts to Aristotle, that cemented the notion that Western man was the culmination of creation. This forms the fundamental culture battle that we see played out every single day of our lives.

    Perhaps, it is this self-appointed godhood that gives the negative forces all its righteous energy.


    Jung explaining why he believes that there is indeed an inner process that sometimes corresponds with conscious thought and sometimes not:

    "But should it turn out that the psyche does not coincide with consciousness, and, what is more, that it functions unconsciously in a way similar to, or different from, the conscious portion of it, then our disquiet must rise to point of agitation. For then it is no longer a question of epistemological limits (my note: justified belief or opinion) but of a flimsy threshold that separates us from the contents of the psyche."

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    Senior Member Adam Bomm's Avatar
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    Re: Man and Myth

    Confusion in the human animal is creating multiple bifurcations in human culture. (my note)

    "Within the psychic sphere the function can be deflected through the action of the will and modified in a great variety of ways. This is possible because the system of instincts is not truly harmonious in composition and is exposed to numerous internal collisions. One instinct disturbs and displaces the other, and although, taken as a whole, it is the instincts that make individual life possible, their blind compulsive character affords frequent occasion for mutual injury. Differentiations of function from compulsive instinctuality, and its voluntary application, are of paramount importance in the maintenance of life. But this increases the possibility of collision and produces cleavages--the very disassociations which are forever putting the unity of consciousness in jeopardy.

    In the psychic sphere, as we have seen, the will influences the function. It does this by virtue of the fact that it is itself a form of energy and has the power to overcome another form. In this sphere which I define as psychic the will is in the last resort."

    - Jung -

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